Radio

It Shouldn't Happen to a Radio Presenter 30: Hosting a Labour Party Leadership Hustings

25 Jul 2015 at 15:27

A few people have asked what it was like hosting the Labour Leadership hustings debate and how I prepared for it, so I thought I’d jot down a few notes about what happened both in the runup to and at our live 90 minute debate on Wednesday.

I have seen several of the other hustings and found them rather uninspiring. A major reason for this was the format – opening statements, followed by questioning from an interviewer followed by closing statements. Boring, snoring. The format didn’t enable the candidates to really get stuck into any issue. Partly due to time constraints too, there was little interaction between the candidates, and the opening/closing statements were a complete waste of time as the candidates just trotted out well worn cliches and phrases which they had used in previous hustings.

Somewhere in the deep mists of time I remember seeing a US Presidential Primary – a republican one, I think – where the candidates were allowed to quiz each other. We used that format in the Women Leaders Debate and Business debate during the election, and it worked brilliantly. The politicians liked it and so did the listeners, so we thought we’d use it here too. I wasn’t sure that the four campaigns would go for this so we didn’t actually give them a choice – we just told them that was happening and none of them argued. In order to avoid repetition of questions we asked them all to provide their questions to us in advance. When they started to come through I was fairly confident this was going to be a sparkier affair than the previous hustings. One of the candidates in particular had a question which I thought could be incendiary. Unfortunately, when it came to it, that particular candidate wimped out of asking the question and asked a much more watered down version. Shame! You can watch the four ‘Ask me Anything’ sections HERE but here’s Jeremy Corbyns’…

I also made a deliberate decision not to do any preparation whatsoever. I had no notes, no reams of briefing material in front of me. All I had was my laptop, which came in very useful at one point when Andy Burnham was talking about privatisation in the NHS and how he would reverse it all. I was pretty sure that he had been Health Secretary when the decision was made to privatise Hinchingbrooke Hospital. I googled it and sure enough, I was right. His defence was that it had actually happened in 2011, after he had left office. Ah, I said, but you took the decision, didn’t you. It was one of his more uncomfortable moments.

You might be rather shocked and surprised that I did little preparation. I think interviewers and hosts are often more obsessed about following their instructions and trotting out embarassing quotes that their producer has found and spend the whole time trying to trip people up than actually facilitating a proper debate. I didn’t want to do that. Although I think I intervened at appropriate moments and pushed the various candidates when I thought they were blustering, the 90 minutes was about them and not about me. Seeing as I had to present my normal show between 4 and 7, it was just as well I wasn’t paranoid about preparing, because I had no chance to anyway! Can you imagine Andrew Neil, doing that? No, me neither. It’s rather different doing these things outside the BBC. I had one producer working on the hustings show, and two on the rest of the programme. I’ll leave it to your imagination to imagine how many Andrew Neil had helping him prepare for the Sunday Politics hustings. And I say that not by way of complaining in any way whatsoever. I rather like our ‘just in time’ working patterns. As a presenter, it certainly keeps you on your toes!

I only imposed myself into the debate when I thought I should or when I was prompted by my producer, Matt Harris, to do so. Matt and I have a brilliant understanding. He knows when I might be tempted to avoid going in for the kill and he often comes up with brilliant questions in my ear, that I might not have thought of. Every presenter needs a producer who knows them inside out, knows how their brain works and when they need a bit of help. I often joke that I am but a mere mouthpiece of Matt Harris. It’s not really like that, because believe it or not I do have a mind of my own (!), but his interventions make me appear much better than I really am.

Some of the best moments in the debate were when I just sat back, said nothing at all and let the four of them go at it. I can remember four of five occasions where I just thought, no, don’t intervene, the listener will get far more out of this if I just remain silent. Obviously when they are all speaking at once, you have to intervene to restore order, but in this type of format the presenter should think of themselves as the conductor of the orchestra, rather than the chief violinist.

We were also determined to introduce subjects and questions which the candidates would probably not have been asked before. Most of the previous hustings had covered the same ground and we saw little point in choosing questions about whether Labour had spent too much in office etc as by now they would all have well rehearsed answers on those subjects. So most of the questions – all submitted by listeners – were somewhat different and more original. We had created a page on the LBC website where we invited listeners to submit questions, and around 1000 people did, especially in the 48 hours in the runup to the event. Many of those were on the welfare bill vote on Monday evening, which had clearly annoyed a lot of people. That was the question we kicked off with. But a good example of the sort of ‘different’ question we wanted was one on religion. Did the candidates ‘do God’?

Most of the questions came from listeners who had pre-submitted them, although we did take a couple of live ones on the night. One of those was from ‘Nigel in Kent’, aka Nigel Farage.

Every programme needs moments like that and the candidates seemed to enjoy being able to have a go at a political opponent.

As a presenter, I am normally the very worst judge of how an interview or show is going, but in this case I knew it was going well almost from the off. It had pace and a real sense of liveliness. I decided that apart from mentioning the four names in the talkup/introduction I wouldn’t even say hello to them as the chit chat at the beginning is usually slightly forced and achieves nothing. So I went straight to the first question on the welfare bill.

The studio format, and the fact that they were all sat within a couple of feet of each other meant a degree of intimacy was achieved, which would not have happened if we had staged this in front of an audience at an outside venue. They would have all been behind podiums or sat awkwardly on stools. Initially, I was keen to host it elsewhere as an outside broadcast, but I am glad my colleagues won the debate about doing it in our rather space-age new studio, It was the right decision.

We streamed the event live on our website in HD, and we had our highest ever audience in terms of numbers of people who streamed the event live on their phones, tablets or PCs. We were also trending number one on Twitter in London. Our web team did a brilliant job in chopping up the best bits and getting them on the website (see HERE) and the whole 90 minute programme was available for people to download within a very short time of it finishing (see HERE.

Obviously this was a radio show, but we now have this magnificent multi-media studio, so as a presenter you have to get used to the fact that you’re actually presenting a TV show too. I was told there would be a camera on me the whole time, which obviously makes it diffiult to communicate by gesture, or facial expression with the gallery. That proved especially diffiucult when it was clear that Jeremy Corbyn’s iPad kept making audible noises, something he seemed blissfully unaware of. Then Andy Burnham’s mobile also started making noises. We all had to have makeup, which sounds ridiculous for a radio show, but when everything is being filmed in HD, let’s face it, some of us needed it more than others. I had my makeup applied in the 530 and 545 news and travel breaks. It took longer than when I do the Sky News paper review!

So who won? The truth is I don’t know. I haven’t watched the whole thing back yet. Most people think Jeremy Corbyn did better than the others and they think it was summed up in this exchange on the question of whether they would have Ed Miliband in their Shadow Cabinets…

I actually thought Yvette Cooper did better than most other people did. But she really does need to learn to come off that fence more. Andy Burnham was more subdued that usual and he really needs to get away from just relying on the appeal of a blunt-speaking northerner. Liz Kendall had some flashes of what impressed people in the first weeks of this leadership race but I think she also needs to expand her appeal beyond appealing to Blairites.

Jon Craig from Sky News told me afterwards that all four had told him they thought this was the best and liveliest hustings so far and they were really happy with how I had coordinated it all. They all certainly seemed happy as we went off air. In fact there were lots of hugs!

For me, I felt I came of age as a presenter that night. That might seem a funny thing to say, but I still regard myself as a bit of a ‘newbie’ at all this. I saw very few people criticising me for being a biased (which is the usual accusation of my detractors) and most people seemed to think I had been fair to all candidates. I know for some people I will never escape my Tory past, and frankly I have given up trying to, but on Wednesday even some of my usual critics grudgingly admitted that they couldn’t justify their usual line of attack.

All along I felt I had got the balance about right between rigorous interviewing and lightheartedness and that’s what other people seemed to think too. What some people don’t understand is that you don’t have to shout at politicians when you push them for an answer. If you do, they invariably put up the shutters. I think a conversational approach works far better, and I think the style I deployed on Wednesday was totally reflective of the way I normally do individual interviews.

This blogpost has turned out to be rather longer than I had intended! So let’s finish with some thanks to all those who were involved in setting up these hustings. To the Labour Party for being incredibly easy to deal with. To the candidates who were all enthusiastic about the format. To the LBC management who backed us all the way in putting on the hustings. And finally thanks to my three LBC producers, Matt Harris, Jagruti Dave and Axel Kacoutie. We’ve worked together on Drive now for two and a half years and have become a real team. And that teamwork was what made Wednesday evening such a success.

And now we turn our attention to delivering equally enjoyable hustings programmes for the London Mayoral candidates from the Labour and Conservative parties. Watch this space.

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WATCH: The Youtuber Who Jumped Off Tower Bridge

24 Jul 2015 at 18:32

Faisal Shinwari jumped off Tower Bridge yesterday. In this interview he tells me why he did it and that he regrets being so stupid. And then came Lucy from Reigate who didn’t hold back…

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ConHome Diary: A "Butt Cock" Clenchingly Awful Video

24 Jul 2015 at 14:50

I feel a bit like a dog returning to its vomit, as each week I write about the Conservative London mayoral selection, but how can I possibly let Ivan Massow’s new campaign video pass without comment [Insert embedded video here]. Delusional is one word to describe it. Creepy is another. Quite which of his campaign team (I assume he has one) came up with this ridiculous idea, I’d love to know so I could ridicule the shit out of them. But in the end a candidate is responsible for his own campaign and Massow is responsible for this abortion of a video. If he really doesn’t know what Londoners want, then you’d think he might actually visit a few areas and ask people in the street. Bearing in mind that D-Day for all the candidates is Saturday, when they all face their interviews, He only had about 5 nights to spend with Londoners anyway, after the release of the video. But frankly, what kind of weirdo would invite Ivan Massow to spend a night with them (nudge, nudge, arf arf)? After all, this is a man who has 30 paintings of himself adorning the walls of his house. I mean, what kind of narcissist would even think of doing that? I’m not exactly known to be shy in the ego stakes, but I don’t have a single picture, let alone a painting of myself on display in Simmons-Dale Towers. I don’t like to frighten any visitors. When I first saw the video on Sunday night I tweeted that I found it “buttock clenchingly awful”. Unfortunately the person who runs the LBC twitter feed didn’t quite read that correctly and tweeted out that I had said it was “butt cock clenchingly awful”. There are plenty of jokes there if you look hard enough. So many that I won’t even try. Luckily the tweet was removed rather quickly. Shame the video wasn’t.
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Oh what I wouldn’t give to be a fly on the wall at the mayoral interviews on Saturday. Especially the bit when someone questions the fact that of the 7 declared candidates they’re only allowed to put through two or three. I’d be willing to bet that in the end four candidates will go through the final, and they will be Zac Goldsmith, Syed Kamall, Philippa Roe and Stephen Greenhalgh. We’ll soon see.
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One of the post-election pleasures that many of us look forward to is buying a copy of the Times Guide to the House of Commons. I can’t be the only one that is that sad. Come on admit it. You agree with me, right? However, as a Conservative I don’t much like change. I hated it when they changed the format and didn’t include biographical details of the losing candidates. I hated it when they changed the size. Call me semi-autistic but I like symmetry on my bookshelves. So I was less than gruntled when I got my 2015 copy this week to find that instead of the nice shiny paper they used to use, they now use a form of Izal Medicated loo paper. When you’re paying £60 for a book you expect a bit quantity as well as quantity. The 2010 Times Guide had 30 essays analysing the election – the 2015 edition has four. The photographs of the new MPs are miniscule. And-absolutely unforgivably, the constituency results don’t include the majority of the winning candidate. They’ve also gone all tabloid in the biographical details. And they misspelt Tracey Crouch’s Christian name in the Chatham & Aylesford section, forgetting the ‘E’ in Tracy. If that’s the only error, they can be forgiven. When you undertake compiling a mammoth reference work like this you wouldn’t be human if the odd error didn’t creep in. In our own ‘Politicos Guide to the New House of Commons’ we said that SNP MP Chris Stephens had been a loan broker. He got in touch to say it was news to him. Wrong Chris Stephens, apparently. He was a good sport about it. Anyway, if you can’t afford to pay £60 for an inferior Times Guide, fine, but you may think the Politicos Guide is more of a bargain at £19.99!!!
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On Wednesday night I hosted a Labour Party Leadership hustings debate with the four candidates. Having watched several of the TV hustings I was determined that we’d spice it up a bit, seeing as the TV hustings had turned into boreathons or had been largely about the interviewer/presenter and how clever they could be. If you missed it you can watch the whole thing HERE. I decided to let them slug it out and let them quiz each other for quite a lot of the ninety minutes and it really seemed to work judging from the comments I read afterwards. It was clear to me that Jeremy Corbyn won, in the sense that he was the one that gave consistently clear answers which appealed to the selectorate who will be voting. It’s astonishing that he’s made so much headway and is now considered a real contender to win. I am starting to wonder if Liz Kendall might pull out in order to stop him in his tracks. I’d imagine Yvette Cooper would be the beneficiary of that. Yvette’s trouble is that she has become the Ronan Keating of this campaign, believing that she says it best when she says nothing at all. It’s the kind of safety first Stanley Baldwin would have been proud of. But it may prove to be very clever in the end, as I suspect she could well win on second preferences.

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LBC 97.3: Iain Dale Has a Testy Encounter With Anjem Choudary

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Video

WATCH: The LBC Labour Leadership Hustings Debate

22 Jul 2015 at 23:53

This is the complete video of the 90 minute long LBC Labour Leadership Debate with Andy Burnham, Yvetter Cooper, Jeremy Corbyn and Liz Kendall, hosted by me. It’s in three parts.

What did you think? Have to say I really enjoyed it. I’m told in the Green Room afterwards all four candidates said it was the best hustings they had done. They seemed to like the ASK ME ANYTHING sections.

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UK Politics

LISTEN/WATCH: Live from 7pm Tonight on LBC, the Labour Leadership Hustings

22 Jul 2015 at 13:56

Just to let you know that this evening (Wednesday) I will be hosting a 90 minute Labour leadership hustings on LBC Radio. It will be broadcast in HD on LBC.co.uk. You can listen in London on 97.3FM, nationally on DAB radio or on TV on Freeview channel 732 or Sky TV channel 0112.

The format of this hustings will be very different to previous ones. It will feature four ‘ask me anything’ slots, where each of the candidates will face questions from the other three. Listeners will phone in with their questions, and there will be a couple of surprises.

On the day that the Times shows Jeremy Corbyn with a commanding poll lead, could this finally be the hustings which sets the leadership campaign alight?

I do hope you will tune in or watch at LBC.co.uk from 7pm. And do tweet along with the show with your pithy comments. No, I said pithy!

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Random Thoughts

Attitude Column: Why Do We Have to Be Labelled?

20 Jul 2015 at 08:34

What’s in a name? Who do we all have to have a label? We’re all individuals, aren’t we? I’ve just been reading about the new acronym that is supposed to replace LGBT. Apparently we’re now all supposed to say LGBTIQ, or even – wait for it – LGBTIQQAA. Nope, me neither.

For the uninitiated, the IQ stands for ‘Intersex’ and ‘Queer’. The QAA then stands for ‘Questioning’, ‘Asexual’ and ‘Allies’. You couldn’t really make it up.

It’s interesting to look at the history of ‘gay’ terminology. The word ‘homosexual’ tended to be used as a catch all and it wasn’t until the 1970s that ‘gay’ became the preferred self-describing word by gay men. Towards the end of the decade the phrase ‘gay and lesbian’ entered common parlance. It wasn’t until 1988 that LGBT started being used, despite gay and lesbian activists remaining suspicious of bisexuals on the basis that they were really gay people who were too afraid to admit it. Hmmm. It’s only in recent times that these longer acronyms have started to be used. The Green Party Manifesto’s chapter on equality issues used the LGBTIQ term, provoking much discussion about its appropriateness. The political editor of the People, Nigel Nelson, incurred the wrath of some by describing the acronym as a ‘Countdown Counundrum’. He added: “Queers may hope to rebrand this word as an inoffensive umbrella term… [but] as a middle-aged, middle class, heterosexual white man, I could no more bring myself to say what sounds offensive than call black people the N word”. Well I think he’s got a very valid point. I wince every time I hear a black man or woman use the N word, and I don’t like hearing the Q word either. To me it’s a word with hugely pejorative connotations and I do not understand the desire of anyone to ‘reclaim’ it. Why? What would be the point? Leave it for the bigots.

Still, at least none of these are as bad the term coined by the Wesleyan University. They have invented ‘LGBTTQQFAGPBDSM’ which stands for “lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, queer, questioning, flexual, asexual, gender-fuck, polyamorous, bondage/discipline, dominance/submission, and sadism/masochism”. Jesus wept. And what the chuffing hell is a ‘flexual’?

We live in an era where a slight slip of the tongue can cause a massive Twitter storm. Woe betide any radio presenter who doesn’t use the B &T in LGBT. Woe betide the TV interviewer who uses the generic ‘black’ for any person who isn’t white. No, it’s de rigeur to use the phrase Black & Minority Ethnic. Use anything else and you’re a racist. Twitter says so, so it must be true.

I studied Linguistics at university. Well, truth be told, I went one better and studied German linguistics. It formed a third of my degree. I still find the development of language fascinating. Why is it, for instance that a word used very commonly in one decade becomes a complete no-no a decade later?

Political correctness forms at least part of the answer. To her dying day my mother would always refer to BME people as ‘coloured’. She wasn’t in the least bit racist but for her it was the natural word. It was a benign word she grew up with. But at some point this word was ruled as being almost as bad as the ‘N’ word. It’s strange, because in America it doesn’t quite have the same connotations as here. I remember one occasion when she said it – totally innocently – and I hissed “Mum! You can’t say that!” She never really did understand, bless her.

I’ve never described myself as a gay man. I am a man who happens to be gay. My sexuality is part of who I am but it doesn’t define me. At least not in my eyes. When I was a political candidate I was always described as “openly gay”. It really used to annoy me, especially when it was written by people who ought to know better. I’m also openly right handed. Or openly a West Ham supporter. Or openly a radio presenter. Or openly right wing. All these things form part of who I am, but I hate being labelled. I am what I am.

This article first appeared in the August edition of ATTITUDE MAGAZINE

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ConHome Diary: London Mayoral Campaign - Sunlight is the Best Form of Disinfectant

17 Jul 2015 at 14:52

ConservativeHome has been doing some sterling work this week in exposing the secrecy of CCHQ in the London Mayoral selection. Quite why CCHQ feels the need to act like an arm of the North Korean regime is a question only they can answer. Surely party members have a right to know exactly who is doing the interviews and sifting, and how many people are involved. Wasn’t it David Cameron who once said that “sunlight is the best form of disinfectant”. He was right then and he is right now. Andrew Feldman, the party chairman, is a great man and someone who I have a lot of time for. However, he is in his position because of his close friendship to the Prime Minister. So far as I know he has never been elected to anything in his life. It’s perfectly understandable, therefore, that he won’t understand why the party expects more openness in selections and that they might rather like a choice of more than two people. There are plenty of precedents. For instance, I was in a final of seven candidates for the parliamentary selection of Bracknell. I came third behind Philip Lee and Rory Stewart, since you ask.

It seems to me it is very difficult to argue that there shouldn’t be at least four names on the mayoral shortlist. We all know that Zac Goldsmith is and will be the chosen one and that’s fine. I have a lot of time for him and think he’s eminently qualified to do the job. But surely the same can be said for Sayed Kamall, the leader of the wider Conservative group in the European Parliament. And Stephen Greenhalgh, Boris’s Deputy Mayor for Policing and Crime. If the list is indeed restricted to three, then one of those won’t make it, because as sure as night follows day, Philippa Roe, the leader of Westminster Council will be included.

I’d love to hear Andrew Feldman explain why Syed Kamall is fit to lead a major European Parliament Group but isn’t fit to be on a London mayoral shortlist. I’d love to hear him explain why Stephen Greenhalgh, who has oversight of the Metropolitan Police is capable of doing that job, but shouldn’t be on a mayoral shortlist.
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So the conclusion of the British Election Study was that not enough Labour voters turned out to vote. No shit Sherlock. I bet that was a really difficult conclusion to come to. And taxpayers’ money no doubt funded this.
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On Monday, I interviewed Zac Goldsmith for half an hour on my LBC Radio show. He certainly knows how to give a good interview. It produced at least four good newslines, but virtually none of which were picked by other news media. The exception was the London Evening Standard, but their credit to LBC for the interview came right at the end of the piece. Zac told me he wouldn’t stand in a by-election if the Heathrow decision doesn’t go his way. He’d concentrate on his mayoral campaign. Now that’s a Grade A news story by anyone’s standard. He also said that unlike Boris Johnson he would intervene in industrial negotiations and that he wouldn’t apologise to Sir Howard Davies, the chair of the Airports Commission, for impugning his integrity on my show the previous week. He also talked about being thrown out of Eton when a small amount of cannabis was found in his room. Matthew Parris wrote a very anti-Zac column in The Times last weekend and he reckoned that Cameron would find Tessa Jowell easier to deal with as Mayor of London than Zac. Possibly true, but does that really matter? A bit of creative tension in politics can sometimes be a good thing.
Insert Embed code for Zac interview


I don’t shout at people very often on the radio, but I do get riled when someone says the jews should get over the Holocaust. Earlier this week I hosted a discussion on whether 94 year old former Auschwitz guard Oskar Groenig should have been jailed for four years. It provoked a heated debate, but I am afraid I lost my temper with a caller who suggested that jews should just move on. Listen HERE {insert link https://audioboom.com/boos/3376930-iain-dale-takes-on-a-caller-who-suggests-we-should-get-over-the-holocaust-and-stuns-him-to-silence?playlist_direction=forward ]. It just shows the ignorance there still is out there about the Holocaust. The shame of it is that the caller had just listened to me interview an Auschwitz survivor, Ivor Perl, who had given evidence at the trial of Groenig, and he still went on to utter his shameful remarks. If you want to listen to a real hero, take ten minutes out of your day to listen to Ivor Perl HERE [insert link http://www.lbc.co.uk/auschwitz-survivor-i-cannot-say-i-forgive-112962]
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Next Wednesday I will be hosting a hustings on the radio for the four Labour Leadership candidates. It will be a bit different to the ones they have done so far in that there will be an opportunity for the candidates to question each other. I don’t know why but I am especially looking forward to Liz Kendall questioning Jeremy Corbyn… The programme will be broadcast live on LBC from 7pm-8.30pm next Wednesday. You can also watch in HD on the LBC website. End of plug.
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Loving the way the BBC is using its own programmes to urge the government to “leave the BBC alone”. I’ve just seen a tweet from the Victoria Derbyshire programme which has Michael Palin on purely to defend the BBC and have a go at the government for its no doubt very wicked plans. I’m not sure this is wise by the BBC. If I were John Whittingdale I’d take a dim view of the BBC using its programmes to do this. If it has a case to make, it should be made by its executives directly to the government, rather than using popular famous faces to pull at the heartstrings of the viewing public.
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Video: Iain Reports on Life in Rwanda

18 Doughty Street

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Books

LISTEN: Half an Hour With Michael Dobbs

17 Jul 2015 at 09:49

Every week I now do a political books podcast for Politicos.co.uk. You can download on iTunes, Soundcloud or Sticher. I’ll also always post them on here from now on. This week I talk to Michael Dobbs for half an hour about all sorts of things, including HOUSE OF CARDS as well as a wealth of other creative projects that are in the pipeline. Lord Dobbs provides insight into the current environment in the House of Lords, while also listing the three books he is planning to take on his much-needed holiday.

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LBC Book Club: Iain talks to Katie Price

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WATCH: Interview with Zac Goldsmith

16 Jul 2015 at 10:27

Earlier this week I interviewed Zac Goldmsith about his London mayoral ambitions. It was a very revealing interview in which Zac refused point blank to apologise to Sir Howard Davies for his remarks on the conduct of the Airports Commission and said for the first time he wouldn’t stand in a by-election if the Heathrow decision goes against him. He also talked about being thrown out of Eton and made clear some differences with Boris Johnson.

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Radio

It Shouldn't Happen to a Radio Presenter 29: When a Caller Says Jews Should Get Over the Holocaust

15 Jul 2015 at 21:39

It’s not often I shout at a caller or stun them into silence, but that is what happened tonight on LBC. I was conducting a phone-in about the 94 year old Auschwitz guard who was sentenced to four years in prison today in a court in the German town of Lueneburg. I started off by interviewing holocaust survivor Ivor Perl, whose parents and sisters were murdered iN Auschwitz. Ivor and his brother managed to survive. He testified in the court hearing. Here is my interview with him, which set the scene for what followed.

Towards the end of the hour I took a call from Tom in Chelsea who reckoned the jailing of Oskar Groenig was unjustified. He then went on to suggest that jews should just get over the holocaust. I saw red…

I don’t lose my rag very often. I think radio presenters who do that more or less every day do it as an act and just do it to provoke. If I do it people sit up and take notice because it’s very unlike me. I’m usually quite calm, even when discussing quite controversial subjects.

Anyway, I’d be interested in whether I should have remained calm here too!

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